forestkingdoms:

"These advertisements address different types of issues, but they’re all about giving a voice to the voiceless. Most of us love animals, and yet we remain ignorant of or apathetic towards the abuse of domestic or circus animals or the extinction, poaching and over-harvesting of wild populations."

Powerful Animal Ads

(via psychedelic-tea)



That line is about the idea that if you love someone in a real way, more than yourself, then you’re no longer free because all your decisions are gonna be factored into their happiness and their well-being and you want to preserve that love. You have something to lose and you are scared to lose it.
Conor Oberst, on the lyrics, “everyone has a choice to be loved or to be free” and “freedom’s the opposite of love.” (via vanderlyle-crybaby-geeks)


diegueno:


This is a potentially tragic turning point in American politics and policy. We are on the verge of turning over the internet – the most important communications system ever invented– to telecoms that grew huge through the government granting them monopoly status. Barring a genuine shift in policy or a court stepping in to ensure fair treatment of captive customers – or better yet, genuine competition – companies like Verizon and Comcast will have staggering power to decide what bits of information reach your devices and mine, in what order and at what speed. That is, assuming we’re permitted to get that information at all.Do we want an open internet? Do we want digital innovation and free speech to thrive? If we continue down the regulatory road pursued by the former cable and wireless industry lobbyist Tom Wheeler, all of those good things will be in serious jeopardy.

(via The FCC is about to axe-murder net neutrality. Don’t get mad – get even | Dan Gillmor | Comment is free | theguardian.com)
Did you know that Wheeler has a comment page? Do you care enough about the way that the internet is presented to you to tell him what a rotten rule he has proposed? Are you genuinely upset to enough about the death of net neutrality to actually write someone who has something to do with it?

diegueno:

This is a potentially tragic turning point in American politics and policy. We are on the verge of turning over the internet – the most important communications system ever invented– to telecoms that grew huge through the government granting them monopoly status. Barring a genuine shift in policy or a court stepping in to ensure fair treatment of captive customers – or better yet, genuine competition – companies like Verizon and Comcast will have staggering power to decide what bits of information reach your devices and mine, in what order and at what speed. That is, assuming we’re permitted to get that information at all.

Do we want an open internet? Do we want digital innovation and free speech to thrive? If we continue down the regulatory road pursued by the former cable and wireless industry lobbyist Tom Wheeler, all of those good things will be in serious jeopardy.

(via The FCC is about to axe-murder net neutrality. Don’t get mad – get even | Dan Gillmor | Comment is free | theguardian.com)



Did you know that Wheeler has a comment page? Do you care enough about the way that the internet is presented to you to tell him what a rotten rule he has proposed? Are you genuinely upset to enough about the death of net neutrality to actually write someone who has something to do with it?

(via disciplesofmalcolm)


barackthehalls:

neonshi:

milafawnkawaiielfgoddessangelic:

truthtellingtime:

Just so everybody knows, the mirror is actually more reliable than the camera. Even though people say “the camera never lies”, it distorts your photographs a little bit. It has to turn a 3d image (you in real life) to a 2d image (a photograph) and consequently skews the proportions a little bit.
Also, “photogenic” is a real thing. Certain faces photograph well and others don’t. It’s all down the angles, proportions and size of your features.
Have you ever seen someone stunning who looks great in professional photographs and not in candids? Yeah, that’s because there’s a huge difference between a professional and an amateur. Professionals know how to minimise the issues cameras have. Lighting, angles and even the distance you are away from the camera plays a part (the amount of distortion varies depending on how close you are).
TL;DR if you think you look great in the mirror but not in the photo, trust the mirror. You look great!

NOT ONLY THAT, but when you look in a mirror, you’re seeing your face in motion, how others would see it. In a photograph, you’re still, and it can make small flaws and the like seem a lot more prominent, despite them being quite minuscule in person.

Also! Also, when you see yourself in the mirror you are looking at you face reverse of how a camera pics it up. No face is perfectly symmetrical so you get so used to seeing a mirrored version of your face that when it’s flipped in a picture you subconsciously notice the tiny differences in your face and thus you think you don’t look right.

I have never felt so relieved and beautiful thank you guys

barackthehalls:

neonshi:

milafawnkawaiielfgoddessangelic:

truthtellingtime:

Just so everybody knows, the mirror is actually more reliable than the camera. Even though people say “the camera never lies”, it distorts your photographs a little bit. It has to turn a 3d image (you in real life) to a 2d image (a photograph) and consequently skews the proportions a little bit.

Also, “photogenic” is a real thing. Certain faces photograph well and others don’t. It’s all down the angles, proportions and size of your features.

Have you ever seen someone stunning who looks great in professional photographs and not in candids? Yeah, that’s because there’s a huge difference between a professional and an amateur. Professionals know how to minimise the issues cameras have. Lighting, angles and even the distance you are away from the camera plays a part (the amount of distortion varies depending on how close you are).

TL;DR if you think you look great in the mirror but not in the photo, trust the mirror. You look great!

NOT ONLY THAT, but when you look in a mirror, you’re seeing your face in motion, how others would see it. In a photograph, you’re still, and it can make small flaws and the like seem a lot more prominent, despite them being quite minuscule in person.

Also! Also, when you see yourself in the mirror you are looking at you face reverse of how a camera pics it up. No face is perfectly symmetrical so you get so used to seeing a mirrored version of your face that when it’s flipped in a picture you subconsciously notice the tiny differences in your face and thus you think you don’t look right.

I have never felt so relieved and beautiful thank you guys

(Source: owlygem, via myheadisweak)


manwithoutties:

Having sex in the morning, your love was foreign to me
It made me think maybe human is not such a bad thing to be
But I just laid there in protest, entirely fucked
It’s such a stubborn reminder one perfect night’s not enough

(Source: joycemanor.bandcamp.com, via fluxdoldrums)

85,883 plays

nutopiancitizen:

Micheal Parenti

nutopiancitizen:

Micheal Parenti

(via myheadisweak)


anarcho-queer:

think-progress:

"Everything you say, every character typed is being watched."
There’s no such thing as a private Facebook chat.

"If you think your messages to your Facebook friends are private, think again. The social network announced that it has plans to look at your personal conversations as a way to make more profits from targeted advertising.
Facebook has been a leader in data-mining, taking information from people’s profiles and studying their behavior to make money and improve the website. But its decision to delve into private content marks the next frontier for Big Data. Silicon Valley and big businesses alike have become increasingly reliant on data mining, which can predict election outcomes based on social media posts, or make a connection between what words people use and the weather.
In its quarterly investors conference call in late April, Facebook’s chief operations officer, Sheryl Sandberg, explained exactly why the company is going further to track your data: “Our goal is that every time you open News Feed, every time you look at Facebook, you see something, whether it’s from consumers or whether it’s from marketers, that really delights you, that you are genuinely happy to see.”
To do that, Facebook wants to take a look at your private messages. “Facebook historically has focused on friends and public content,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said on the call. “Now, with Messenger and WhatsApp, we’re taking a couple of different approaches towards more private content as well.””

anarcho-queer:

think-progress:

"Everything you say, every character typed is being watched."

There’s no such thing as a private Facebook chat.

"If you think your messages to your Facebook friends are private, think again. The social network announced that it has plans to look at your personal conversations as a way to make more profits from targeted advertising.

Facebook has been a leader in data-mining, taking information from people’s profiles and studying their behavior to make money and improve the website. But its decision to delve into private content marks the next frontier for Big Data. Silicon Valley and big businesses alike have become increasingly reliant on data mining, which can predict election outcomes based on social media posts, or make a connection between what words people use and the weather.

In its quarterly investors conference call in late April, Facebook’s chief operations officer, Sheryl Sandberg, explained exactly why the company is going further to track your data: “Our goal is that every time you open News Feed, every time you look at Facebook, you see something, whether it’s from consumers or whether it’s from marketers, that really delights you, that you are genuinely happy to see.

To do that, Facebook wants to take a look at your private messages. “Facebook historically has focused on friends and public content,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said on the call. “Now, with Messenger and WhatsApp, we’re taking a couple of different approaches towards more private content as well.””

(via myheadisweak)


owning-my-truth:

atane:

dynamicafrica:

atane:

Looks like US soldiers will be on their way to Nigeria. President Jonathan accepted the offer.
Since this is really going to happen, I truly hope the US is in and out. However, going by history, I know that the US rarely ever enters and leaves. They occupy.

It’s a matter of wait and see now.

Yup.

Before I was open to this given the disastrous state of our military but after reading this great Compare Afrique article, “Dear Americans, Your Hashtags Won’t #BringBackOurGirls. You Might Actually Be Making Things Worse" and remembering the history of US military "intervention" globally, I’m very much disturbed now. The US military are also likely sending more drones into Nigeria and perpetuating the neo-imperialist cycle that we all know too well. This IOU will have to be "repaid" a million times over, and, as Jumoke Balogun of Compare Afrique pointed out, the mission of AFRICOM (United States Africa Command) is explicitly to “advance U.S. national security interests.”
There is no altruism there. There is nothing about the cherished, sentimental Western saviordom many people are clinging to right now. AFRICOM is there for the US and the US only at the end of the day.
Moreover, this is decentering the conversation away from accountability from the Nigerian government, which is now facing the largest mass protest movement we’ve seen in many years (that do not have to do with fuel subsidies). 

[image description: Recent #BringBackOurGirls protests in Ibadan, Nigeria. There are thousands of women packing the streets wearing red geles and holding signs outside of a government building]
These protests are a watershed moment in Nigerian democracy, which directly confront the endemic corruption and the moral bankruptcy of our political leadership in Nigeria. But of course, just as momentum is continuing to build for accountability and reform, the “Western saviors” swoop in from above to #bringbackourgirls. 
So not only are we making a deal with the devil who is sending AFRICOM in to “advance U.S. national security interests" with more drones and an increased US military presence on the ground in Nigeria as well, but we are also watching the West co-opt and decenter the conversation around #bringbackourgirls as well.
Teju Cole put it perfectly and succinctly here:

[image description: Tweet from Teju Cole @tejucole, “Remember: #bringbackourgirls, a vital moment for Nigerian democracy, is not the same as #bringbackourgirls, a wave of global sentimentality”]
Westerners across racial lines are missing the point. They are promoting terrible petitions to push even more US military assets into Nigeria, ignoring the brutal history of the US military industrial complex and pushing an agenda which in the long term will hurt Nigeria far more than it might “help” in the short term. They are ignoring the fact that Boko Haram (which loosely means, “Western education is sinful”) in its rhetoric is explicitly anti-imperialist, so adding Western military into the geopolitical mix just destabilizes the situation further and advances their long term goals as a terrorist organization. They are ignoring the actual needs of Nigerian activists on the ground in Nigeria, undermining this crucial moment for Nigerian democracy and making it about them and their sentimentality.
This is becoming #KONY2012 on steroids, with Western feelings and long term US military interests again taking center stage ahead of the needs and interests of Africans. The fact that the creator of Kony 2012 is now being interviewed by major news outlets about the NIGERIAN crisis is incredibly telling and should be a major red flag to many observers, especially given how incredibly problematic that campaign was and how quickly it was discredited by many Africans directly involved in the conflict.
All of this shows the incredible narcissism that lies at the heart of Western hegemonic power, that people across racial lines are making #bringbackourgirls about them and providing an excellent pretext and manufactured consent to push US neocolonial military interests in the region. The US military are not the bed fellows we want to keep under any circumstances. Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. put it brilliantly when he said:

“The greatest purveyor of violence in the world : My own Government, I can not be Silent.”

As a Nigerian-American, I also am easily seduced by Western hegemonic power and dominance. I previously welcomed the movement of “limited” US military and intelligence assets into Nigeria, but I now remember so clearly that there is never any such thing as “limited” anything with the US military. And we are again watching the West and Westerns of all races co-opt and disrupt a crucial moment in Nigerian democracy and political activism for their own ends with their brazen militarism and advocacy for America’s global neo-imperialist agenda.
So, as Jumoke Balogun of Compare Afrique ends his piece, I will end mine as well:

If you must do something, learn more about the amazing activists and journalists like this one, this one, andthis one just to name a few, who have risked arrests and their lives as they challenge the Nigerian government to do better for its people within the democratic process.  If you must tweet, tweet to support and embolden them, don’t direct your calls to action to the United States government who seeks to only embolden American militarism. Don’t join the American government and military in co-opting this movement started and sustained by Nigerians.

owning-my-truth:

atane:

dynamicafrica:

atane:

Looks like US soldiers will be on their way to Nigeria. President Jonathan accepted the offer.

Since this is really going to happen, I truly hope the US is in and out. However, going by history, I know that the US rarely ever enters and leaves. They occupy.

It’s a matter of wait and see now.

Yup.

Before I was open to this given the disastrous state of our military but after reading this great Compare Afrique article, “Dear Americans, Your Hashtags Won’t #BringBackOurGirls. You Might Actually Be Making Things Worse" and remembering the history of US military "intervention" globally, I’m very much disturbed now. The US military are also likely sending more drones into Nigeria and perpetuating the neo-imperialist cycle that we all know too well. This IOU will have to be "repaid" a million times over, and, as Jumoke Balogun of Compare Afrique pointed out, the mission of AFRICOM (United States Africa Command) is explicitly to advance U.S. national security interests.”

There is no altruism there. There is nothing about the cherished, sentimental Western saviordom many people are clinging to right now. AFRICOM is there for the US and the US only at the end of the day.

Moreover, this is decentering the conversation away from accountability from the Nigerian government, which is now facing the largest mass protest movement we’ve seen in many years (that do not have to do with fuel subsidies).

[image description: Recent #BringBackOurGirls protests in Ibadan, Nigeria. There are thousands of women packing the streets wearing red geles and holding signs outside of a government building]

These protests are a watershed moment in Nigerian democracy, which directly confront the endemic corruption and the moral bankruptcy of our political leadership in Nigeria. But of course, just as momentum is continuing to build for accountability and reform, the “Western saviors” swoop in from above to #bringbackourgirls. 

So not only are we making a deal with the devil who is sending AFRICOM in to advance U.S. national security interests" with more drones and an increased US military presence on the ground in Nigeria as well, but we are also watching the West co-opt and decenter the conversation around #bringbackourgirls as well.

Teju Cole put it perfectly and succinctly here:

[image description: Tweet from Teju Cole @tejucole, “Remember: #bringbackourgirls, a vital moment for Nigerian democracy, is not the same as #bringbackourgirls, a wave of global sentimentality”]

Westerners across racial lines are missing the point. They are promoting terrible petitions to push even more US military assets into Nigeria, ignoring the brutal history of the US military industrial complex and pushing an agenda which in the long term will hurt Nigeria far more than it might “help” in the short term. They are ignoring the fact that Boko Haram (which loosely means, “Western education is sinful”) in its rhetoric is explicitly anti-imperialist, so adding Western military into the geopolitical mix just destabilizes the situation further and advances their long term goals as a terrorist organization. They are ignoring the actual needs of Nigerian activists on the ground in Nigeria, undermining this crucial moment for Nigerian democracy and making it about them and their sentimentality.

This is becoming #KONY2012 on steroids, with Western feelings and long term US military interests again taking center stage ahead of the needs and interests of Africans. The fact that the creator of Kony 2012 is now being interviewed by major news outlets about the NIGERIAN crisis is incredibly telling and should be a major red flag to many observers, especially given how incredibly problematic that campaign was and how quickly it was discredited by many Africans directly involved in the conflict.

All of this shows the incredible narcissism that lies at the heart of Western hegemonic power, that people across racial lines are making #bringbackourgirls about them and providing an excellent pretext and manufactured consent to push US neocolonial military interests in the region. The US military are not the bed fellows we want to keep under any circumstances. Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. put it brilliantly when he said:

“The greatest purveyor of violence in the world : My own Government, I can not be Silent.”

As a Nigerian-American, I also am easily seduced by Western hegemonic power and dominance. I previously welcomed the movement of “limited” US military and intelligence assets into Nigeria, but I now remember so clearly that there is never any such thing as “limited” anything with the US military. And we are again watching the West and Westerns of all races co-opt and disrupt a crucial moment in Nigerian democracy and political activism for their own ends with their brazen militarism and advocacy for America’s global neo-imperialist agenda.

So, as Jumoke Balogun of Compare Afrique ends his piece, I will end mine as well:

If you must do something, learn more about the amazing activists and journalists like this onethis one, andthis one just to name a few, who have risked arrests and their lives as they challenge the Nigerian government to do better for its people within the democratic process.  If you must tweet, tweet to support and embolden them, don’t direct your calls to action to the United States government who seeks to only embolden American militarism. Don’t join the American government and military in co-opting this movement started and sustained by Nigerians.

(via disciplesofmalcolm)


megad0uche:

fuckinggno:

epitomeofloyalty:

Ellen gets Ellen’s blessing

Ellenception

Gay Ellen, meet Gay Ellen

(via isexualdisaster)



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